Nutley Windmill – 50th anniversary celebrations

Rev Anthony Shaw - One of the original founders

Uckfield and District Preservation Society celebrated its 50th anniversary on the 12th May.

As part of the celebrations the 300 year old Nutley Windmill had an open day with invited guests including Wealden MP Nus Ghani.

Nutley Windmill is thought to have been moved from Goudhurst circa 1817.

The first record of a windmill at Nutley is in 1840. A timber in the mill has been dated by dendrochronology to 1738-70, and the main post is even older, dating to 1533-70.

In 1870, the mill was painted white and working on four common sails.

The mill was modernised in the 1880s, with the original wooden wind shaft being replaced by a cast iron one, and spring sails replacing the commons. Larger millstones were added. The mill was tarred at about this point, as shown by a photo dated 1890.

She worked by wind until 1908, although latterly in poor condition. In 1928, the owner of the mill, Lady Castle Stewart had the mill shored up with brick piers and steel joists below the body. These allowed the mill to survive until she could be restored.

Restoration started in 1968, The mill turned by wind again in 1971, and ground grain again in 1972. In 1975, Nutley Windmill was given to the Uckfield and District Preservation Society by Lady Castle Stewart.

The mill was damaged in the Great Storm of 1987 with over £6,000 worth of damage incurred. New rear steps were fitted to the mill in 1994/5, the work funded by a grant from British Telecom. Repairs to the trestle and head wheel in 1998 allowed the head stones to be worked for the first time since the mill stopped work.

New sails were fitted to the mill in 2008. Nutley Windmill featured on a postage stamp issued by the Royal Mail on 20 June 2017.

All images Uckfield FM (c)

The Reverend Anthony Shaw spoke with Mike Skinner about his association with and memories of the windmill

Robert Pike, a volunteer at the windmill spoke with Mike Skinner about the mill’s history and gave him a guided tour

 

 

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